Forms used by Indochinese refugees

Indochinese refugees families applying to come to Canada completed an IMM8 application form, usually right after they had been interviewed and accepted by a visa officer. Unique to the Indochinese movement, departmental officials also developed and utilized the IMM1314 form to simplify and expedite processing.Completed by hand at interview, the  IMM1314 captured the composition of each complete family,the interviewing officer’s notes and eventually the medical and security results. Once overseas processing was complete, the form served as  both travel document for the Government-chartered flights and visa to enter Canada. The  IMM1314 reduced the paper work for the Indochinese refugees by 50% and resulted in massive savings in time for visa officials often working under challenging circumstances in remote camps and under much pressure to get refugees on to the airplanes.Examples of the forms, held at Library and Archives Canada, have been added to this site. After the refugees had arrived at the receptions centres in Edmonton and Montreal, each one received a landing record (form IMM1000)

Download (i-79531.pdf, Unknown)

CIHS is a sponsor and, through members of its executive, a participant in a September 21 symposium at Carleton University in Ottawa on the 1980s Ba’hai Refugee Program to Canada. For more information visit the symposium website.

The website of the Canadian International Council has posted some personal reflections on watershed events in Canada’s refugee program. Note particularly those of Professors Michael Molloy and Howard Adelman as well as of Geoffrey Cameron, the 2014 Gunn Prize winner.